Category Archives: Memorabilia

Fine Autographs and Manuscripts Featuring Space and Aviation up for Viewing Until April 20th

iCollector.com is presenting online viewing of the April 20th, 2017 Auction from RR Auction. This auction catalog has over 480 lots available for viewing with an incredible array of autographs and artifacts available for bidding through the auctioneer. RR Auctions is a globally recognized and trusted source for rare documents, manuscripts, autographs, and historic artifacts. They have achieved countless record setting prices in over 425 successful sales and have an international reputation through both media and private collectors.

The highlight of the sale is Lot 8216 and is an Apollo 11 Flown Command Columbia Rescue Arrow from Crew Hatch. Valued at well over $100,000 this is a museum quality historical piece that is a one of a kind find at auction. As fully described in the catalog:

Amazing flown gold-colored “Rescue” arrow from the hatch of the Apollo 11 Command Module ‘Columbia,’ measuring 11.75? x 3.5?, which was applied over the capsule’s exterior Kapton foil covering. The arrow pointed to the panel used to gain access to the spacecraft’s cabin from the outside, which would have been used in case of emergency. It has a distinctive and unique burn pattern due to the high temperature of re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, and is clearly photo-matched to the photos taken of the Command Module upon Pacific Ocean recovery on July 24, 1969. As one of the only immediately visually identifiable elements of the spacecraft’s exterior, this is a truly remarkable and displayable piece; such flown items are virtually unobtainable. In very good condition, with a split at the center; it is currently taped to a black sheet but could easily be removed for display. From the collection of a former North American Aviation quality control engineer and accompanied by a signed photo of him working inside a Command Module, and a letter of provenance.

This item was featured with its owner on the February 27, 2017 episode of Antiques Roadshow. He worked at North American Aviation as an inspector and later as a quality control engineer, resulting in his extensive interaction with each Apollo Command Module and the astronauts who flew onboard them. Overall, he worked on NASA’s spacecraft from the unmanned flight and test spacecraft to Apollo 1 all the way through Apollo 17, Apollo-Soyuz, three Skylab missions, and preflight development of the Space Shuttle. After the historic Apollo 11 mission, and following its initial quarantine at the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas, the capsule was temporarily transferred back to North American Aviation in Downey, California, for post mission performance analysis and cleanup. The quality control engineer received this arrow decal, which would have been otherwise consigned to disposal after the spacecraft’s exterior was thoroughly stripped down by NAA’s engineering team.

The very next lot is an Apollo 11 Flown Command Module Columbia ID Plate at Lot 8217. This is valued between $50,000 and $100,000 and is another one of a kind piece. RR Auctions describes this treasure as:

The original flown main assembly parts tag mounted on the spacecraft bulkhead immediately inboard of the right hand rendezvous window of the Apollo 11 Command Module ‘Columbia,’ 3? x 1?, embossed with identification information: “Command Module, Ser 107, Pt No. V36-000002-111, Model V36-3, Contr. 7137.” The tag bears two quality inspection stamps on the right side. In very good to fine condition, with scattered staining. From the collection of a former North American Aviation quality control engineer and accompanied by a signed 2016 photo of him peering into the Apollo 9 Command Module as displayed in the San Diego Air & Space Museum, and a letter of provenance.

This item was featured with its owner on the February 27, 2017 episode of Antiques Roadshow. He worked at North American Aviation as an inspector and later as a quality control engineer, resulting in his extensive interaction with each Apollo Command Module and the astronauts who flew onboard them. Overall, he worked on NASA’s spacecraft from the unmanned flight and test spacecraft to Apollo 1 all the way through Apollo 17, Apollo-Soyuz, three Skylab missions, and preflight development of the Space Shuttle. After the historic Apollo 11 mission, the Command Module was returned to North American Aviation in Downey, California, for study. The quality control engineer was given this parts tag after the spacecraft was stripped down and cleaned by NAA’s engineering team, as he was the person who applied the final quality inspection stamp.

The full catalog is showing on iCollector.com up until April 20th, 2017. Interested bidders can contact the auctioneer through the website to discuss being part of the auction and placing bids. RR Auction carefully prepared this incredible catalog and look forward to sharing these treasures with collectors and historians around the world.

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